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History Mystery #92: The Case of Gabby’s Place

Image of the wooden sign that used to be in front of Gabby's Place.

Prepared by Dan Carrion, Historian, E. Clampus Vitas Grub Gulch 41-49 Chapter While driving on Highway 41 about three miles above Coarsegold Village, there is a curve in the highway with turnouts on either side of the road. On the north side of the road, there is a flat spot about a half-acre in size, nestled in front of a ...

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How Art Shapes Our Lives: Thomas Hill

Image of Yosemite Valley.

By Sal Maccarone Artists have been rendering their surroundings ever since they began to walk the earth. For instance, primitive cave paintings and pre-historic petroglyphs bear witness to the way things were. Landscape paintings are the only record that we have about where, and how these ancient groups lived. Bodies of water, forests, mountains, valleys, animals and people are just ...

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How Art Shapes Our Lives: The Gilded Age Mansions

Image of a Rhode Island mansion known as The Breakers.

By Sal Maccarone During the years following 1870 America was beginning to enjoy a bustling industrial economy. As with some of the phenomena of today’s world, a few remarkable individuals became very wealthy during this short lived era. This time period is now referred to as “The Gilded Age”, a name first coined through the title of a book which ...

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History Mystery #91: The Case of the Cold-Blooded Cavalry

Image of old west wagon wheels.

Article submitted by Lynn Northrop, Raymond Museum This letter (see below) was sent to me by ex-Raymondites Bob and Trina Quinn via a friend of theirs. We are hoping someone knows this Ducker name in our area and may have a family history or story about what happened to the cavalry soldiers that perpetrated this crime. In Raymond’s history we ...

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How Art Shapes Our Lives: The Palace of Fine Arts

Image of the Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco.

By Sal Maccarone It is fascinating once realized how the discovery of gold here in California had such a profound impact worldwide. For instance, as a direct result of the 1849 gold rush, leaders in this country began thinking more seriously about connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. This of course was to facilitate commerce by moving goods, (and people), ...

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Virtual Yosemite: Soda Springs

Image of Soda Springs.

For the interactive 360° VR experience, go to: www.virtualyosemite.org/virtual-tour/#node220. Yosemite today announced that the park will reopen again this coming Friday morning at 9 a.m. The smoky conditions and unhealthy air from the nearby Creek Fire have diminished somewhat – at least temporarily. Note that day-use and/or overnight reservations are still required for entry to the park from the www.recreation.gov ...

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How Art Shapes Our Lives: The Oscar

Image of Walt Disney and Shirley Temple at the Oscars.

By Sal Maccarone The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences was the idea of Louis B. Mayer (1884-1957), head of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM.) Mr. Mayer felt that the organization would lend respectability and status to the movie industry, the reputation of which had been tarnished during the Roaring Twenties. So on May 4, 1927, the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts ...

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History Mystery #90: The Case of the Perplexing Pumitile

Image of a pumitile brick.

By Connie Popelish, North Fork History Group Some of the special features of North Fork architecture include the unique buildings made of blocks of pumice and cement, known as pumitile. Pumitile concrete bricks were manufactured by the Jourdan Concrete Pipe Company of Fresno, beginning around 1931. Initially, the company made concrete pipes for sewage systems, but eventually branched out, designing open-interior ...

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History Mystery #89: The Case of the Mystery Mining Machines

Image of old mining machinery.

By Karen Morris, CHS President COARSEGOLD — The Coarsegold Historical Society has three pieces of mining machinery on display at the Coarsegold Historic Museum. They were donated quite a few years ago and we need help with the names and how they were used. We think the middle one was possibly some kind of rock crusher. If you can help ...

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History Mystery #88: The Case of the Missing Hospital

Picture of an operating room.

Submitted by Debby Carter, SHSA Librarian (Fresno Flats) MOUNTAIN AREA — An article on the front page of the October 29, 1970, Sierra Star reads: “Bass Lake Receives 200 Bed Hospital: On Tuesday, Oct. 27, a full 200-bed hospital will be delivered to Bass Lake. According to Supervisor Lonnie Cornwell and Chairman of the Board Herman Neufeld of Madera County, ...

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