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Corsica's Cap Corse

Quick, what language is spoken in Corsica? If you said Corsu, or lingua corsa, congratulations. Actually, French is the official language, but the names of towns, streets, restaurants, and businesses make it look like the native Corsican language is a combination of French and Italian. And of course the most famous Corsican of them all was Napoleon Bonaparte, but we had only a week there and didn’t make it far south enough to visit his birthplace.

Quick, what language is spoken in Corsica? If you said Corsu, or lingua corsa, congratulations. Actually, French is the official language, but the names of towns, streets, restaurants, and businesses make it look like the native Corsican language is a combination of French and Italian. And of course the most famous Corsican of them all was Napoleon Bonaparte, but we had only a week there and didn’t make it far south enough to visit his birthplace.

It’s a beautiful island with some spectacular scenery and the scariest cliffhanging, no shouldered, twisting, roads I’ve driven, putting Sicily and the Amalfi coast in second place (pics to come). We spent our first nights near Bastia, and explored the northern tip (Cap Corse), sparsely populated with the occasional seaside village, and a lot of coastline that looks like northern California, and farm animals wandering the roads with nary a farmer in sight (again, pics to come).

The harbor of the town of Bastia (stress on the last syllable):

Some great reflections to be had:

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Buildings with character:

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On our walks we saw lots of beautiful houses, no two alike. Here the great dog photographer (me) met a man with a dog, who invited us into
his back yard patio where we met his wife and admired the million dollar view of the Mediterranean, and his lemon tree (following photo).

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The village of Nonza, where the centuries-old houses seem to defy gravity. I leaned over a rock wall to take this shot, but you can tell by the left side of the building that I mostly got it vertical. I cropped off the bottom one third, which goes down to the ocean.
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In Nonza, Pat peruses a menu for Corsican specialties, which were delicious. Good beer, too, infused with a little of the native chestnut.We ate outdoors 95 percent of the time in our four weeks in France.

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We climbed up to an old Genovese lookout tower and looked down on the grey slate rooftops and the ochre church. For some reason this is one of my favorite pics from our vacation.
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Lots of wildflowers on Corsica, especially these red poppies.
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Hillside towns are typical of Corsica. Here we had pizza and chatted for an hour with the Italian cook. We frequently met Italian Corsicans, which delighted Pat, whose Italian is much better than her French.
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