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Porto, Corsica

From the east coast of Corsica we drove to the west coast, a beautiful drive over rocky mountains with lots of forests and almost no towns. We stayed 3 nights at our only resort stop on our trip, the charming bustling villaage of Porto, and its surroundings.

From the east coast of Corsica we drove to the west coast, a beautiful drive over rocky mountains with lots of forests and almost no towns. We stayed 3 nights at our only resort stop on our trip, the charming bustling villaage of Porto, and its surroundings.

Looking down on the village from a rocky hill, topped with a Genovese lookout tower.
The beach was empty, a little too early for the tourist rush (exactly as we planned it)

Porto Corsica2


Porto Corsica3

Porto Corsica4

The 15th (or something like that) century tower from which we viewed the village:

A boat ride took us out to the Calanques, rocky cliffs that turn into beautiful colors in the late afternoon sun. We were fortunate to have mild seas because, as you can see in the previous pics, the water was too rough for the boats to go out the next day.

Porto Corsica5

Porto Corsica6

There were a few of these caves, too narrow for our sight seeing boat to enter very far:

Porto Corsica7

Porto Corsica8

A couple glasses of kir while awaiting dinner at the Soleil Couchant (setting sun) restaurant. The next two pics were taken from there,so you can see the restaurant is well named.

Porto Corsica9

Porto Corsica10

Breakfasts were OJ (always fresh squeezed), great French coffee, baguettes with jam, croissants, and sometimes pain au chocolat, my favorite.

Try some of Patrick’s at La Boulangerie in Fresno.
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Porto Corsica12

We took a couple of hikes, but I can’t find the pics from the Spelunca Gorge hike.

Typical Corsican mountain landscape. Junipers and chestnut trees dominate:

Porto Corsica13

Porto Corsica14

One reason we like small family run B&Bs (Chambres d’Hôtes) is that we could get acquainted with the owners. Mme Poggioli is typical of Corsicans with Italian names but pronounced with the French pronuncation (Posholi). Like many, she’s bilingual in French and Italian but speaks no English.

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